What we spend & how we spend it

On this page you will find financial information relating to the police budget projected and actual income, and expenditure relating to our budget, statement of accounts, expenditure over £500, contracts and expenses.

Police Budget

The PCC holds a shared responsibility with the Chief Constable for providing effective financial and budget planning for the short, medium and longer term. In consultation with the Chief Constable, the PCC is required to set a budget for the forthcoming year.

The Financial Management Code of Practice provides clarity on financial governance arrangements within the police service in England and Wales.

Additionally the PCC makes other decisions throughout the year which we publish on our PCC Decisions page, you can view these here.

2018/19 Budget & Policing Precept

Approval of the Council Tax Precept and Revenue and Capital Budgets 2018/19

The PCC has approved the Council Tax Precept and Revenue and Capital Budgets 2018/19.

On 19 January 2018 the Police and Crime Panel agreed the proposal of the Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner (the PCC) to issue a band D council tax precept for the Sussex area of £165.91.

There are statutory requirements for the PCC to calculate the budget requirements and formally issue a precept for the financial year. A public consultation took place between 5th November 2017 to 5th January 2018 on a potential precept increase. A total of 4,559 responses were received across the above period and the percentage in favour of an increase was the highest to date.

Full details can be found in the report.

View the Sussex Police Precept 2018/19 leaflet, which will be distributed with local Council Tax bills here.

In addition, a summary of the Frequently Asked Questions can be viewed through the following link:

Frequently Asked Questions - Budget and Precept 2018-19

Medium Term Financial Strategy 2018/22

The PCC has approved the Medium Term Financial Strategy (MTFS) 2018/19 to 2021/22.

The MTFS sets out the key financial issues facing the Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) over the period 2018/19 to 2021/22, and provides options for delivering a sustainable budget and capital programme over the medium term.

It also sets out how the Commissioner can provide the Chief Constable with the resources to deliver the priorities in the Police and Crime Plan.

The MTFS sets the financial context for the PCC’s revenue budget, capital programme and precept decisions.

The MTFS can be viewed here.

To find out more about the Chief Constable's financial plans for 2018/19 please click here.

2017/18 Budget & Policing Precept

Information about the total police budget for 2017-18 can be found in the following links:

The PCC sought the views of Sussex taxpayers regarding the 2017/18 police precept (the amount you pay for policing in your Council Tax). The majority of respondents supported an increase of 3.36%. This proposal follows a business case set out by the Chief Constable for additional investment to provide over 100 additional police officers and specialist staff to strengthen four areas of local policing: Community Investigation Teams, Armed Response Officers, Public Protection Investigators and Expert Youth Teams.

The precept proposal was supported by members of the Sussex Police & Crime Panel at their meeting on 20 January 2017. This means that local taxpayers will pay an additional £5.00 for policing per year per household (for a Band D property).

Further information about how the policing element of your Council Tax will be spent in 2017/18 can be found on the following link:

In addition, a summary of the Frequently Asked Questions can be viewed through the following link:

The PCC approved the Council Tax Precept and Revenue and Capital Budget 2017/18 on 9 February 2017. This is all set out in the report here.

How Sussex Police uses its budget

Please click on the links to below to see how Sussex Police uses its budget, and independent assessment of its value for money from Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary.

  • The annual statements of accounts can be found at this link

If you would to participate in any future police and crime surveys and receive regular updates from the Office of the Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner please click here.

2016/17 Budget & Policing Precept

Information about the total police budget for 2016-17 can be found in the following links:

The Commissioner sought the views of Sussex taxpayers regarding the 2016-17 police precept (the amount you pay for policing in your Council Tax). The majority of respondents supported an increase of 3.4%. This proposal follows a business case set out by the Chief Constable for additional investment to support operational demands including digital forensics and protecting vulnerable people. The precept proposal was supported by members of the Sussex Police & Crime Panel at their meeting on 22 January 2016. This means that local taxpayers will pay an additional £5.00 for policing per year per household (for a Band D property).

Further information about how the policing element of your Council Tax will be spent in 2016-17 can be found on the following link:

In addition, a summary of the Frequently Asked Questions can be viewed through the following link:

How Sussex Police uses its budget

Please click on the links to below to see how Sussex Police uses its budget, and independent assessment of its value for money from Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary.

2015/16 Budget & Policing Precept

Information about the total police budget for 2015-16 can be found in the following links:

The Commissioner sought the views of Sussex taxpayers regarding the 2015-16 police precept (the amount you pay for policing in your Council Tax). The majority of respondents supported a prudent increase of 1.98%. This proposal follows a business case set out by the Chief Constable for additional investment to support operational demands including improving the Force’s ability to tackle child sexual exploitation and respond to incidents of cybercrime. The precept proposal was supported by members of the Sussex Police & Crime Panel at their meeting on 23 January 2015. This means that local taxpayers will pay an additional £2.79 for policing per year per household (for a Band D property).

Further information about how the policing element of your Council Tax will be spent in 2015-16 can be found on the following link:

In addition, a summary of the Frequently Asked Questions can be viewed through the following link:

2014/15 Budget & Policing Precept

Information about the total police budget for 2014-15 can be found in the following links:

Following a government announcement in early 2014 about Council Tax Referendum Limits, the Commissioner decided, with the support of the Police & Crime Panel, to increase the policing part of the Council Tax for 2014-15 by 1.95%. This added £2.70 per year per household for a Band D property in Sussex.

The Commissioner has a statutory obligation to set the police budget and that is why the views of Sussex taxpayers regarding a potential increase were sought. The results of a public consultation showed that the majority (67%) of respondents supported a precept increase of 3.6% in 2015/15 to fund future investment in areas such as reducing serious sexual offending and tackling child exploitation, strengthening the fight against cyber crime and increasing the visibility of frontline policing.

A precept rise of 1.95% still enabled Sussex Police to invest in the above areas with revisions to the timescale for delivery of these investments.

You can find out more about how the police precept was spent in 2014-15 on the following link:

2013/14 Budget & Policing Precept

Budget information for the 2013-14 financial year can be found on the links below:

The PCC froze the policing element of the Council Tax (the Policing Precept) in 2013-14, meaning Sussex taxpayers paid the same amount for policing as the previous year.

Reserves

Reserves are like jam jars of cash that we save up for specific uses, such as to buy expensive items like cars and equipment, for that ‘rainy day’ when we need access to a pot of cash to meet an unexpected cost, or as a place to set aside money we look after on behalf of others.

The Reserves held by PCC by type are summarised in the table below.

A brief description of each of these ‘reserves’, why they are held and what they will be spent on follow. 

  • General Reserve - This reserve is set aside for unexpected events or emergencies and provides a working cash balance to help with the impact of uneven cash flows and avoid unnecessary temporary borrowing. The balance is maintained at 4% of the net revenue budget.

  • Insurance Reserve - Is maintained for self-insurance and excess policy costs. The balance is reviewed each year by a professional firm of actuaries.

  • Capital and Investment – This reserves will be used to fund, in part or in full, spends on items that will have a life of greater than one year such as vehicles, buildings or equipment, or improvements to them. The plans for that spend are set out in section 15 of the MTFS 18/22.

  • Capital Receipts – The sale of buildings or other assets creates income known as capital receipts. These sums are set aside in the reserve and then used to part fund the capital investment plan.

  • The PFI Reserve is no longer required. The balance is being used in full to fund a review of the existing contract over 17/18 to 18/19.

  • Asset Seizure – If Sussex Police seize cash or assets from criminal activities they are allowed to keep a proportion of it. So that Ferrari the criminal bought from the proceeds of crime is sold. We put this money in this pot and then spend it each on policing, crime reduction and other things.

  • The DBHR or Delegated Budget Holder Reserve is where we put some of the cash that is left over at the end of each year. The money is then used to help make the changes Sussex Police have planned as set out in the financial strategy. Money may also be held for other purposes which we set out in the financial strategy.

  • Sussex Safer Roads Partnership (SSRP) – This holds the balance of money arising from traffic fines which is used to make Sussex Roads safer. The PCC looks after this money on behalf of the partnership.

  • The Local Policing Transition Reserve is available to the Chief Constable to support changes to the workforce and help to maintain the numbers of officers and staff over the next 4 years.

Further details of those reserves and the PCC's Reserves Policy can be found here and also within the MTFS 18/22 which can be found earlier on this page.

Contracts and Tenders

The Elected Local Policing Bodies Order 2011 (as amended in 2012/2013) set out the requirements for Police & Crime Commissioners and Chief Constables to publish information on details of contracts and tender information.

Sussex Police aims to deliver a first class service whilst ensuring the Force obtains value for money within its contracts and procurement. We make sure that contracts are in place to deliver a wide variety of services from operational equipment to services for support to the Force.

Sussex and Surrey Police now collaborate on procurement.

It is a requirement within the Financial Regulations that value for money is a consideration in all procurement decisions. More information can be found in contract standing orders and the financial regulations .

You can find out more about Sussex Police’s contracts and tenders via the joint Bluelight Procurement Portal.

Full copies of contracts over £10,000 and invitations to tender over £10,000 are available on request through the Joint Procurement Service Unit for Sussex and Surrey by email to: JointProcurementService@surrey.pnn.police.uk

Tender opportunities may also be viewed on the Emergency Services Tendering system at www.bluelight.gov.uk. This system is continually updated with tender opportunities which allows organisations to register within specific areas of interest to receive email notification of new tender opportunities including those from other emergency services. Tenders are also advertised on Contract Finder https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder ” or in TED (Tenders Electronic Daily) – the online version of the 'Supplement to the Official Journal of the European Union' (OJEU) as appropriate http://ted.europa.eu/TED/main/HomePage.do

We list all expenditure exceeding £500. You can view up to date lists of all expenditure exceeding £500 by individual month here.

Crime & disorder reduction grants

The Commissioner has allocated a number of crime and disorder reduction grants through the Community Safety Fund and Victims’ Services Fund. The name of the projects, recipients, grants awarded and the sources of funding for the successful applications can be viewed here.

Annual Investment Strategy

The 2017/18 Treasury Management Strategy Statement was endorsed by the Joint Audit Committee on 23 March 2017 and approved by the Commissioner on 27 March 2017.

Expenditure

We list all expenditure exceeding £500. You can view up to date lists of all expenditure exceeding £500 by individual month here.

Details of contracts awarded

It is a requirement within the Financial Regulations that Value for Money is a consideration in all procurement decisions.

A list of the contracts awarded can be viewed here.

Full copies of contracts over £10,000 are available on request through the Joint Procurement Service Unit for Sussex and Surrey by email to: JointProcurementService@surrey.pnn.police.uk

Total salary costs

The total salary costs for the OSPCC are available by click on the relevant year:

2012/2013

2013/2014

2014/2015

2015/2016

2016/2017

Expenses

The Commissioner’s expenses are published here.

The Chief Executive & Monitoring Officer and Chief Finance Officer’s expenses can be viewed here.

Pay & grading structures

The police staff pay scales, which the OSPCC also abides by, can be viewed here.

Other key financial documents

Code of Corporate Governance Framework incorporating the Statement of Corporate Governance; Code of Corporate Governance; Scheme of Corporate Governance; Financial Regulations and Instructions; Contract Standing Orders; Scheme of Consent; and Scheme of Delegation.

Joint Audit Committee (JAC) – for meeting papers and reports relating to internal audit, external audit and other internal control measures

 

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